So what do we mean by “international”?

While we are based out of Minnesota, USA., childhood and pediatric cancers are a worldwide problem, so we need worldwide awareness and cures. Below view some key facts about worldwide pediatric cancer and the vast disparities in outcomes for kids based on the country in which they were born into.

When we talk about INTERNATIONAL Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day, we mean that we have people from 83 different countries– supporting, remembering & celebrating with us this year! 83 unique, beautiful, sometimes disagreeing, separate government, COUNTRIES!! Behold, the power of ice cream and a love of kids to unite us!

See below for the list of participating countries, please comment if your country is not listed and we will add it!

ice cream globe 3

Behold, the power of ice cream and a love of kids to unite us! #kidsgetcancertoo

Angola
Argentina
Australia
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Bolivia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brazil
Cambodia
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Costa Rica
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Egypt
Fiji
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Honduras
Hong Kong
Hungary
India
Indonesia
Iraq
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jordan
Kenya
Kuwait
Latvia
Macao
Macedonia, the Former Yugoslav Republic
Malaysia
Malta
Mauritius
Mexico
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Pakistan
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Qatar
Republic of Korea
Romania
Russian Federation
Saudi Arabia
Serbia
Singapore
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Syria
Thailand
Tunisia
Turkey
Uganda
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United States
Uruguay
Venezuela
Vietnam

Key facts from the World Health Organization

  • Each year, approximately 400 000 children and adolescents of 0-19 years old are diagnosed with cancer. [1]
  • The most common types of childhood cancers include leukemias, brain cancers, lymphomas and solid tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilms tumours.
  • In high-income countries, where comprehensive services are generally accessible, more than 80% of children with cancer are cured. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), an estimated 15-45% are cured. [3]
  • Childhood cancer cannot generally be prevented or identified through screening.
  • Most childhood cancers can be cured with generic medicines and other forms of treatment, including surgery and radiotherapy. Treatment of childhood cancer can be cost-effective in all income settings. [4]
  • Avoidable deaths from childhood cancers in LMICs result from lack of diagnosis, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, obstacles to accessing care, abandonment of treatment, death from toxicity, and higher rates of relapse. [3]
  • Childhood cancer data systems are needed to drive continuous improvements in the quality of care, and to inform policy decisions.

Key facts

  • Each year, approximately 400 000 children and adolescents of 0-19 years old are diagnosed with cancer. [1]
  • The most common types of childhood cancers include leukemias, brain cancers, lymphomas and solid tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilms tumours.
  • In high-income countries, where comprehensive services are generally accessible, more than 80% of children with cancer are cured. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), an estimated 15-45% are cured. [3]
  • Childhood cancer cannot generally be prevented or identified through screening.
  • Most childhood cancers can be cured with generic medicines and other forms of treatment, including surgery and radiotherapy. Treatment of childhood cancer can be cost-effective in all income settings. [4]
  • Avoidable deaths from childhood cancers in LMICs result from lack of diagnosis, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, obstacles to accessing care, abandonment of treatment, death from toxicity, and higher rates of relapse. [3]
  • Childhood cancer data systems are needed to drive continuous improvements in the quality of care, and to inform policy decisions.

The problem

Cancer is a leading cause of death for children and adolescents, particularly in high-income countries.  The likelihood of surviving a diagnosis of childhood cancer depends on the country in which the child lives: in high-income countries, more than 80% of children with cancer are cured, but in many LMICs only 15-45% are cured [3].

The reasons for lower survival rates in LMICs include: delay in diagnosis and advanced disease, an inability to obtain an accurate diagnosis, inaccessible therapy, abandonment of treatment, death from toxicity (side effects), and avoidable relapse. Improving access to childhood cancer care, including to essential medicines and technologies, is highly cost effective, feasible and can improve survival in all settings [4].

Published by EICFBD Team

Behind Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day is a sister team, run by love for Malia Grace Peterson. Annette Peterson is a wife, mom to three beautiful girls (including Malia), a nurse, an active member of her church, and a chatty introvert who lights up every room she is in. Alisa Matheson a mom, an independent contractor, photographer, and a city-loving girl, who enjoys true crime documentaries, reality TV, and staying home. She was also an aunt/partner in crime to Malia, hosting sleepovers, marshmallow fights, and generally causing a ruckus.

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